Computer Programs for Cognitive Rehabilitation


Motor:   Motor Responding

These programs address planning and coordination of finger movements.. Fine motor control (KEYBDACC) and sequencing (MOTORSEQ) are new programs in this area. The programs require rapid execution of key press sequences; the simplest is the same key pressed 50 times; while more complex involve double alternating series, e.g., ccvvccvv etc. MOTORSEQ allows the clinician to address fine motor control and coordination. One can compare time and accuracy for both dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Cognitive control of movement is incorporated by varying the complexity of different series.

The following sequences are included:

  1. Alternating V's and B's (VBVBVB...) w L & R index fingers
  2. Alternating V's and B's (VBVBVB...) w dominant hand
  3. Alternating V's and B's (VBVBVB...) w non-dominant hand
  4. Double alternating V's and B's (VVBBVV...) w dominant hand
  5. 1 C --> 2 V's --> 3 C's --> 1 V --> 2 C's ... etc.
  6. B 50 times (using dominant hand index finger)
  7. B 50 times (using non-dominant index finger)
  8. B 200 times (using dominant hand index finger)
  9. B 200 times (using non-dominant hand index finger)
  10. C=consonant & V=vowel: word=USA (spelled out)

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Ordering Info


965.9 - MOTORSEQ:   Motor Responding

MOTORSEQ requires rapid execution of key press sequences. The simplest is the same key pressed 50 times;  more complex involve double alternating series, e.g., ccvvccvv etc. The program addresses fine motor coordination and cognitive control of movements. MOTORSEQ allows the clinician to address fine motor control and coordination. One can compare time and accuracy for both dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Cognitive control of movement is incorporated by varying the complexity of different series.


967.8 - KEYBDACC:   Keyboard Accuracy

Keyboard Accuracy addresses fine motor control for movements prompted sequence of random letters. Available sets range from the simple (Left side 'home' keys) to the more complex (All keys). Keyboard Accuracy is a program which is mostly used to evaluate elementary keyboarding skills and specific fine motor finger control through the selection of most typing programs which progress from the right hand keys (JKL:). You can begin with a small set of user-defined keys and progress to a larger set.

However, KEYBDACC can be used for other purposes. For example, with some aphasics: turn off the CAPS LOCK (ordinarily left on during the program) and use lower case stimuli. Profoundly aphasic individuals can then practice learning the equivalency of the stimulus letter and upper case letters on the key caps. At one level, Keyboard Accuracy is a simple visual - visual (screen - keyboard) simultaneous matching task. It can also be used as a simple very short term memory / keyboard learning task. Finally, Keyboard Accuracy can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of devices, training and techniques for keyboard access.          


967.4 - POUNCE: Milestone 1:   Single Discrete Responding

At the first milestone of response competency is the ability to make a simple consistent response. Stimuli may be auditory, visual, or both. This task was developed to work with persons at Milestone 1 (Single consistent response) of coma emergence. The intent is to bring the process of responding into an objective sphere. Responses can be anything a switch can measure - limited only by the ingenuity, resources and technical expertise of the therapist. POUNCE presents visual or auditory stimuli to which a single response is made. The visual portion of POUNCE is simple and centered on the screen. Look for and attempt to train a) rapid onset of response, b) prompt release, and c) no repeats.


967.7 - DIFFERN: MILESTONE 5:   Differential Responding

This task addresses the fifth and final milestone of response competency: the ability to make different (but equivalent) responses to different stimuli. This program requires switch input. The last milestone is represented by the ability to make differential responses depending on the nature of the stimulus. Operationally, it differs from milestone #4 (contingent responding) by the addition of another switch. For example:

A series of trials proceeds with random inter trial intervals. Although the exact series is unpredictable, overall, there is a balance between the two types of stimuli. Throughout the series of programs, the computer keeps track of the individual's scores and conditions selected. At any time, one can exit from the procedures, retaining whatever results are already obtained.


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